Fun with WSL, GitHub CLI and Windows Notifications

Part 2: Using toast for richer desktop notifications

Introduction In the last post we saw how to create a drop-in replacement for notify-send. This allowed us to take a script that used notify-send and run it without modification. In this post, we’ll take a look at how we can update that script to take better advantage of Windows notifications. At the end of the last post, the notification was fairly generic as shown below: In this post, we’ll update the script to indicate whether the run finished successfully or not, change the title to “GitHub”, and include an “Open in Browser” link: [Read More]

Fun with Git for Windows, SSH Keys and Passphrases

Disclaimer: this post is one to file under “things I’m blogging in the hope that I find the answer more quickly next time”. Background I switched to using SSH key auth for GitHub and Azure DevOps Repos a long time ago and never looked back. For a while I was using SSH keys without passphrases but got round to adding passphrases a while back. I set up the Windows OpenSSH Authentication Agent - the service defaults to Disabled so I set it as Automatic start and nudged it to Running. [Read More]

Visual Studio Code and Devcontainers in the Windows Subsystem for Linux (WSL)

UPDATE (2020-04-08): With the 1.44 release of Visual Studio Code (and the corresponding Remote Containers release), the Insiders release is no longer needed as the . I have updated the post to reflect this (update made in vscode devcontainer on stable release 😁). Introduction In my previous post I gave some thoughts on using Visual Studio Code devcontainers. Until very recently your source code needed to be cloned in Windows in order to be able to build and run devcontainers with Visual Studio Code. [Read More]

Visual Studio Code and Devcontainers

Visual Studio Code has support for Remote Development which is a really cool feature. You can connect to another machine via SSH and work with code there (the language services etc run remotely which is the really cool part!), connect to the Windows Subsystem for Linux, or run your development environment in containers (aka devcontainers). The last of these is the topic for this post. My team has been using devcontainers quite heavily for the last few months and found a lot of benefits with them. [Read More]

Error Back-off with Controller Runtime

Kubebuilder provides tooling to help get you started quickly writing operators for Kubernetes, and builds on top of controller-runtime. I’ve been looking at how errors are handled in a couple of Kubebuilder projects recently. I’d seen a couple of GitHub issues that mentioned that controller-runtime has back-off behaviour for errors so started looking through the docs to find out more, but didn’t find anything. If I get chance, I’d like to find a suitable place to send a PR to add some details in the docs, but for now I’m collating my notes here as a reference for future me! [Read More]