Visual Studio Code and Devcontainers in the Windows Subsystem for Linux (WSL)

UPDATE (2020-04-08): With the 1.44 release of Visual Studio Code (and the corresponding Remote Containers release), the Insiders release is no longer needed as the . I have updated the post to reflect this (update made in vscode devcontainer on stable release 😁). Introduction In my previous post I gave some thoughts on using Visual Studio Code devcontainers. Until very recently your source code needed to be cloned in Windows in order to be able to build and run devcontainers with Visual Studio Code. [Read More]

Visual Studio Code and Devcontainers

Visual Studio Code has support for Remote Development which is a really cool feature. You can connect to another machine via SSH and work with code there (the language services etc run remotely which is the really cool part!), connect to the Windows Subsystem for Linux, or run your development environment in containers (aka devcontainers). The last of these is the topic for this post. My team has been using devcontainers quite heavily for the last few months and found a lot of benefits with them. [Read More]

Working With Git Rebase in Visual Studio Code

Following the git theme for mini-posts, I thought I’d give git rebase a mention this time. When I first started working with git I found a way to pretend that it was a source control system like any other that I’d used. Eventually, I was working on a pull request for an OSS project and a maintainer asked me to rebase my changes. Now, I’d heard of rebase at that point but I hadn’t used it, so I was a bit daunted. [Read More]

Setting Visual Studio Code As Your Git Editor

My last post seemed to go down quite well, so I’m going to try a few mini-posts with a ‘tips-and-tricks’ theme. This works well for me as I’d started making some notes about productivity tips I use as part of my prep for an internal no-prep presentation ;-) This one is a really small tip that is covered in the Visual Studio Code docs, but lots of people using Visual Studio Code seem to have missed it so I’m going to mention it here: you can set Visual Studio Code to be your git editor. [Read More]