Forwarding SSH Agent requests from WSL to Windows

Background As I mentioned in my previous post, I switched to using SSH key auth for GitHub and Azure DevOps Repos a long time ago and found it a positive experience. At first I was a bit lazy and didn’t use passphrases on my keys, and just kept a copy of my keys in the .ssh folder in my User folder in Windows and another copy in ~/.ssh in WSL. [Read More]

Fun with Git for Windows, SSH Keys and Passphrases

Disclaimer: this post is one to file under “things I’m blogging in the hope that I find the answer more quickly next time”. Background I switched to using SSH key auth for GitHub and Azure DevOps Repos a long time ago and never looked back. For a while I was using SSH keys without passphrases but got round to adding passphrases a while back. I set up the Windows OpenSSH Authentication Agent - the service defaults to Disabled so I set it as Automatic start and nudged it to Running. [Read More]

Working With Git Rebase in Visual Studio Code

Following the git theme for mini-posts, I thought I’d give git rebase a mention this time. When I first started working with git I found a way to pretend that it was a source control system like any other that I’d used. Eventually, I was working on a pull request for an OSS project and a maintainer asked me to rebase my changes. Now, I’d heard of rebase at that point but I hadn’t used it, so I was a bit daunted. [Read More]

Setting Visual Studio Code As Your Git Editor

My last post seemed to go down quite well, so I’m going to try a few mini-posts with a ‘tips-and-tricks’ theme. This works well for me as I’d started making some notes about productivity tips I use as part of my prep for an internal no-prep presentation ;-) This one is a really small tip that is covered in the Visual Studio Code docs, but lots of people using Visual Studio Code seem to have missed it so I’m going to mention it here: you can set Visual Studio Code to be your git editor. [Read More]